Codecademy Review

Codecademy Review, 2018

A cloud-based online learning platform, Codecademy focuses on the development of IT and programming skills. Pretty much like the name suggests. They’re certainly helping to supply an ever-growing demand for tech-related skills. Anyone interested in learning a programming language or who is considering a career change should pay attention.

Naturally this isn’t the only place you can flex your coding muscles… However, they’re one of the more popular ones in their field having started back in 2011.

What’s interesting to note is that the platform isn’t geared towards beginners only. Professionals (and amateurs!) of any experience level will find something useful here. As anyone in the tech industry knows, re-educating yourself is paramount.

The Codecademy Review: What can I learn here?

During my Codecademy review, I was happy to see an extensive course catalog. What’s also nice is that not every single course was solely focused on learning programming (though naturally, most of them are). There’s even a course on the history of computing, which is great for anyone with a general interest in the subject.

Briefly broken down, the platform’s catalog looks like this:

Learning Paths on Codecademy

Learning paths include:

  • Computer science: The fundamentals of computer science, with a focus on Python. You’ll learn things like an introduction to programming, development skills, linear data structures, complex data structures etc.
  • Code Foundations: This is more “coding focused” and is good for anyone who wants to learn but doesn’t really know where to start. Broken down, you’ll learn a bit of computer science, data science, web development and how to code.
  • Web development: …is naturally more focused on the creation, building and development of websites. There’s everything here from learning front-end technologies like HTML and CSS, JavaScript (the “Holy Trinity” of web dev), Introduction to jQuery etc.
  • Data Science: Data science and visualization, SQL, Python applications and Machine Learning.

There are also other course structures. These include Intensive Programs where you can “upgrade your skills through a rigorous curriculum”. In addition, they give personalized support. These include building websites from scratch, building web APIs, front-end web apps, test-driven development, etc.

In addition, there’s a long list of much shorter courses. Just want to learn markup? Take a look at the Introduction to HTML. More interested in focusing on JavaScript or Python? You can take courses dedicated to those languages.

Is Codecademy free?

Yes! Codecademy is free! You can sign up at no cost and create an account. Learners can then go through a long list of courses and choose what they want to start on. You can even start several courses at once (if you want).

Of course, there are quite a few features this platform offers which you can only get if you decide to go with their “Pro” plan. Now, all courses are free however with “Pro” you can opt for the likes of tailored lessons and tutorials. They also offer live tutoring with their paid plan. A paid plan also gives you access to other forms of premium content such as portfolio building projects (very important for practice) and a customized learning path.

Note: If you don’t want to pay full price, there’s sometimes a Codecademy discount code floating around the place for their courses. Just make sure to keep your eyes out for it.

 

In addition, you can adjust your learning schedule to suit your life. Don’t let kids or a job get in the way!

Conclusion

I am inclined to say in this Codecademy review that the platform is more beneficial for those with intermediate-to-advanced knowledge of coding. Why? Simply because there isn’t much to ‘practice’ in terms of exercises. That’s unless you go Pro, of course (this gives you access to a greater range of projects). One particular problem I had with the Python course was that things were introduced out of context. This made it difficult to grasp why we were doing something. Admittedly, I’m someone who learns best by getting their hands dirty.

For aspiring remote workers interested in breaking into tech or brushing up on those skills, Codecamedy is a good resource.

Codecademy is definitely a good resource. If you prefer learning-by-doing, however, I’d recommend you find a few other resources which provide you with enough exercises. Or, depending on how advanced you are, start creating your own projects.