Can You Make Money Freelance Writing? – Well…

The broad term “freelance writer” applied to me way back when I began my career. I had just moved to a new country. I survived off odd jobs and savings. One of those odd jobs was writing articles online. Although the dollar I got in return (especially when converted to euro) wasn’t much… it upped my income significantly.

peanuts
I was still earning peanuts… but enough to get by.

As I wrote more and got paid more, I slowly started to appreciate the situation I found myself in. The feeling of freedom and independence was intoxicating. So, I made freelance writing my full-time pursuit for the next few years. Like a lot of writers these days, I started at the bottom with low-paying clients (read: horrible content mills).

The desire to earn more money pushed me to market myself and find new opportunities (all online). I thankfully landed myself a handful of well-paying clients. Being treated like an actual person (what!?) was… refreshing.

london brokers logo 400x
My first “content mill”… Not as fancy as its name.

“Can you make money freelance writing?” comes up a lot on Google, forums and social media. Successful freelance writers and bloggers have already answered this with a resounding Yes!

Those (successful) bloggers and freelance writers are right. You can make money as a freelance writer. The thing is… That’s not the question you should be asking. In fact, forget that question entirely. It would be more relevant to ask…

Can I make enough money as a freelance writer to fund the lifestyle I want?

By “lifestyle” I’m not referring to yachts, chauffeurs, multiple residences and 35+ servants. I mean a good standard of living: the ability to comfortably pay your rent/mortgage, cover basic expenses (healthcare etc.), save money and occasionally travel/go on holiday. I’ve seen many freelance writing projects advertised that wouldn’t cover the cost of a Happy Meal.

happy meal toys pikachu squirtle
All that work and not even a toy…

The answer to this question is trickier. You see, there’s something many budding freelance writers forget and it’s this: freelance writing is a business like any other. Don’t have business aptitude? Well, you’d better acquire some.

DON’T quit your day job – What to do instead

Forget the cliché of quitting your job to do the thing you love. Unless you’re independently wealthy or have another source of income, that kind of bullshit doesn’t fly in the real world. The first thing you need to do is know your expenses.

Back when I was starting out, I’d bring in US$1,200.00/month on average (that was a bit less in euro). I had luck on my side: I lived in a “cheap” city and in general, Germany’s cost of living (groceries, going out, etc.) is relatively low. On an hourly basis, I could earn between US$10.00-20.00. It seemed like a good wage at the time – until I factored in how much I worked. Some days, it was 10+ hours. Others, I barely worked three.

If you aim to be a proper professional (as you should), the standard fee a freelance copywriter should charge is around US$50.00 or more.

For anyone starting out (especially if you don’t have much experience), that can seem like a lot. Almost too much, in fact.

Well – get over it.

You’ve got costs to pay. Just like any other business. Even though you’re mainly running it from your laptop, you should consider…

  • The cost of equipment: This includes your smartphone, laptop and other add-ons such as a comfortable place to work (desk & chair – if that’s how you roll) as well as Internet and phone bill (mobile data if you work on the go a lot), hosting for your blog/website etc.
  • Health insurance: Varies by country – but for most people, you’ll have put some money away. One of the few exceptions I know of is the UK – unless you opt for private insurance.
  • Income protection: Again, some countries may have sufficient social welfare to fall back on making this not so much of an issue.
  • Contributions to social welfare/security: Even in countries with good social welfare, you’re required to pay contributions to social welfare.
  • Pension scheme: Even if your country has a state pension, it’s still good to put some money away for retirement.
  • Taxes: Obviously!
  • Other business expenses: Meetings with clients (if they insist on physically meeting in person), etc.
  • And of course, your own wage: How much can you comfortably live on once you’ve subtracted everything else?

Once again, the exact amount you should be charging also depends on where you live. If you’re in Scandinavia, it would cost you a lot more than it would in Thailand. Either way however, US$50.00 per hour is the minimum you should charge.

Will Clients Really Pay Me That Amount?

Any client who tries to stiff you for the lowest amount isn’t a client worth having. There is of course nothing wrong with your client negotiating a slightly lower rate. There’s also nothing wrong with being a little bit flexible, but don’t go too low. Not only does this ruin things for other writers, but it also means lowering your own expectations.

Good clients will pay good rates. The real challenge is finding those clients. That’s where the “business” part of freelance writing comes into play. You are a business and you are selling a service. Get out there and do your marketing!

megaphone
Feel free to yell at people with a megaphone if you think that works. Personally, I’d recommend networking, blogging and getting creative online.

It’s easy for me to say that any client who tries to stiff you isn’t a client worth having. I mean, it is true – but there are certainly times when you’ll feel desperate. However, that’s where having a business plan comes in. That’s why you shouldn’t quit your day job: you may very well need that job to help you get your freelance business up and running.

Making a living as a freelance writer is far from impossible. Many writers consider it a rewarding career. Yet the takeaway here is to never stop thinking of yourself as a business. The job of a writer is more than just typing and sending documents. Work won’t fall into your lap, at least not in the beginning.

Finding Remote Jobs on Indeed.com (It’s Surprisingly Easy)

Did you know there are probably more remote jobs on Indeed.com (and its variations) than even all remote job boards combined?

Like many job seekers across the world, the platform has always been my go-to for finding new jobs. That wasn’t the case when I decided I specifically wanted a work at home position. In fact, I threw it on the backburner and forgot about it. I focused only on platforms like Remotive, RemoteOK and Working Nomads.

That was a mistake.

While I got an interview here and there, I quickly realized that I was at a disadvantage. First, I’m not based in the United States: unfortunately, the majority of roles on work at home sites prefer those based in either the US or Canada. Secondly, with so much competition your chances of actually getting an interview are slim.

That’s when I decided to pull out more stops. I tried Stepstone, Monster and Indeed… The latter turned out to be a useful resource. As one of the world’s most well-known job portals, this platform gets 250 million unique visitors per month. On average, 9.8 jobs are added to the site per second. Even if you’re not a fan of online job sites, it is still a good tool to have in your arsenal.

Of course, you have to know how to use it correctly.

There are just as many, if not more, remote job openings on Indeed.com than other platforms.

Before we go further, keep the following in mind: the keyword “Remote” is frequently used to advertise work from home jobs on “traditional” job search engines… but not always. In fact, thousands of companies on Indeed that offer telecommute positions don’t actively advertise it. That’s where getting an interview is key – once you speak to a hiring manager, you can start asking about their remote policies.

Before we get there, let’s focus on the task at hand. You want to find a bunch of remote jobs on Indeed.com that you can apply to. Depending on where you’re looking, it can be simple or a little more complicated…

The First Method: Search remote jobs on Indeed.com through filtering

This is probably the most straightforward and pain-free way of filtering out non-remote positions on platform. You just have to type keywords related to your role under the “What” section of the search engine. Then, under “Where”, simply type “Remote” (or “Work at Home”…).

That’s it.

remote job indeed com canada search
Tip: Try this a bunch of times, using different keyword variations for both “What” and “Where”.

There’s a catch, though: As far as I can tell, this method only works in on the UK, USA, Australian and Canadian versions of the site. I’ve tried it out on the German, Dutch and Irish versions – but none of these sites offer “Remote” as an alternative to location. When testing it out with the Irish platform, I got the following:

remote job indeed com ireland search

It sucks if you’re not physically located in the Greater Anglophone Area.

Don’t give up, though. If you live somewhere awkward like I do (Germany), try searching for work at home (or “home based”) positions in the UK, USA and Australia. A company that advertises a telecommute position in one country may still be open to candidates from abroad. In my experience, remote positions in the US tend to be the most “restrictive”. However, if you’re located in Europe, UK companies hiring remotely may be open to candidates working from the rest of the EU. It can’t hurt to send an application anyway. Well, maybe a letter bomb… but that’s unlikely.

Still no luck? Don’t give up hope…

Perhaps you don’t live in any of the aforementioned countries. Maybe you’ve sent out a couple of applications anyway, only to be rejected simply based on your location. While other country versions of Indeed.com don’t seem to have a dedicated “Remote” filter, you can still find them. You’ve just gotta get a little creative.

QUICK NOTE: “Remote” does not always mean “work anywhere”. As I have pointed out before, there may be location restrictions. Which is understandable to a degree. A company may, for legal reasons, want a remote worker who is at least legally eligible to work in the country they are based in. Or perhaps they may simply want that person to at least be an hour’s flight away to occasionally attend meetings in the flesh.

 

This method simply involves typing your job role and “Remote” (or related keywords) into the “What” section.

remote job indeed com canada search 2

Under “Where”, simply type the country you’re searching in. Or the city, if you want to explore options in your locality. Even as a remote worker, you may prefer to commute some of the time so it’s still useful to be able to filter out geographical location.

Don’t forget to try this using all variations of remote or their equivalents in your own language. For example, I usually perform separate searches in German and English as they both bring up lots of results. In German I might use the variations “Home Office”, “Heimarbeit” and “Telearbeit”. In English, variations can include “Remote”, “Remote Work”, “Home-Based” etc…

Last but not least… Just ask

If you see a job that doesn’t explicitly state whether remote work is allowed (they may wax lyrical about their “lovely office”, which always puts me off…), send an application anyway, should the role seem like a perfect fit otherwise. In this stage of the process, you’re not trying to get a job. You’re trying to start a conversation. You want to find out more about the role and whether it will interest you. “Remote” is, for all intents and purposes, just a detail (but one that many employers seem to be rather precious about…) it’s no different to asking about perks, vacation time and salary.

 

Working Remotely? Don’t Let Your Employer Skimp on Salary

Remote work and telecommuting offer huge benefits to everyone. In fact, there are more perks for employers than there are for employees.

Firstly, overheads (heat, lighting, subsidized food/coffee/drinks) are significantly reduced. Greater flexibility means happier, more motivated and ultimately more productive employees. This has the knock-on effect of reducing employee turnover (yet another reduced cost for the company).

As an employee who works remotely, you may however feel like the company is doing you a favor by letting you work from home. Many of us have heard the phrase “be grateful you have a job” ad nauseum. Even if the job sucks a little. While a full-time remote work arrangement is fantastic (especially for digital nomads) – there is a slightly negative side-effect.

Quite a few telecommuters may think…

Well, they’re already giving me a lot of freedom… Maybe I shouldn’t be too pushy about asking for a raise/more money.

After all, you can also save a lot of cash. Location independence means fewer transport costs, a home outside of an expensive city center. It’s a pretty neat deal. Hell, you can even move to that cheap, creepy cabin in the woods if your little heart desires.

cabin
…just make sure you have Internet!

Some employers may (knowingly or even unknowingly) capitalize on this attitude and use “remote” as an excuse to pay less. A lot of us don’t feel compelled to complain about this unfair treatment, mainly because working from home is such a huge benefit.

Well, that’s nonsense. Costs or no costs, you deserve to be paid what you’re worth.

You’re still doing the same job. Producing the same (or sometimes better, according to the data) results. Maybe you’re a web developer working on code, a social media manager improving engagement, brand awareness and ultimately profit. Maybe you’re a wizard VA who just gets shit done – in time.

The only real difference is that your in-office counterparts are… Well, sitting in a different building.

That’s not a good reason to feel like you shouldn’t ask for more. Oftentimes, the salary we draw is also equated to time spent in the office. For office workers, perceived productivity begins the moment they sit at their desks. Or when they turn on the computer.

For remote workers, it’s trickier: that’s why so many of us overwork. There’s still the misconception that if you’re not in the office, you’re not really working (or, you’re slacking off completely).

Salary negotiations when you work from home

The good news here is that asking for a raise isn’t a telecommute-specific problem. Even in-office workers may not see their boss/supervisor every day (depending on how big the company is). It’s still something you have to “prep” yourself for. When working remotely, you need to contact them directly.

So, what should you do if you want a raise? Before asking, keep the following in mind:

  • Avoid text. Don’t ask for a raise directly via emails or Slack messages. Important issues like this shouldn’t be conveyed over text. Simply write a message and request a phone call/video chat (or in-person meeting, if it’s possible to comfortably travel to the office).
  • Make a list of your accomplishments. You need to show concrete proof of why you should get more money. If your job directly affects profit (you’re a media buyer who makes $1,000 a extra a week since, for example), show them the number. If your job doesn’t directly impact profits, point out your strengths and how they’re ultimately helping the company and workflow. You don’t have to actually read this list out during the conversation but make sure you keep the points in your head and work them into the conversation.
  • Practice pitching. Sit in front of the mirror, imagine the situation and run through it a few times. You can never truly predict how a conversation will go, but practicing can help to ease your nerves on the day.

It’s very easy to have a slight inferiority complex when it comes to work (especially for women). Remote workers in particular may feel they don’t deserve as much, despite often doing a lot more. However, times are changing and for many professions it is no longer viewed as a perk or a privilege – but a right.

Are Online Side Hustles Worth It?

Who doesn’t LOVE the idea of extra money?

Even if you’re not a greedy capitalist pig *AHEM* very materialistic, you probably could do with a bit of extra cash. It’s nice to have a little bit more tucked away for a rainy day or simply to enjoy a wild weekend in some far-flung city.

woman doing a line
Or enjoy… other things.

It’s no wonder, then, why so many people are looking for online side gigs. Big emphasis on the ONLINE. You literally don’t have to anywhere. Just come home, open your laptop and start working. Maybe two, three four hours a night, two days a week.

Sounds perfect, doesn’t it?

Sadly, life isn’t really like that. The “perfect” online side gig doesn’t really exist. Okay, I’m actually sure it does. However, the majority of people aren’t going to find one after an hour of searching.

Which brings me to my next point:

There’s no such thing as ‘quick’ money.

Go and look up the term “online side gigs”. I dare you. Have a look through them, see what they ask of you and see what they pay.

You’ll find that the Internet is awash with promises – the majority of them bogus. Funnily enough, you’ll also find plenty of ebooks (that you must pay for) explaining how to make an income online (HINT: This is just another person’s side gig making THEM money online!).

I’m not saying that the information you come across is wrong. Actually, most of those bloggers and ebook writers share some very valuable information.

However… Generating cash on the side takes a little thing we call work. Just as much work as you put into your full-time job. Actually, probably more.

Why? Well, simply put…

Even if you just want to make a decent side-income, you need a business mindset.

Sounds boring, doesn’t it?

Or perhaps it sounds look too much effort…

Well, tough luck. That’s business.

Not to discourage you, of course. Having an online side hustle can mean exercising your abilities in a totally different area. If you’re particularly talented at something, it could mean making “easy” money (to an extent) just for doing something you love.

The “doing” in this case is the easy part. Like anything else in business, it’s the acquisition of clients that stumps most people.

Online Side Hustles: Finding one that suits you

What are you good at? If you’re only so-so at coding/programming, even intermediate coding tasks/jobs won’t bring in much profit. Sure, you’ll learn and practice (not at all a bad thing – in fact, I’d encourage it if you want to perfect your skill) but you won’t see much financial return on your time investment.

On the flipside, if you’re a whizz at Photoshop there may be quite a few lucrative side gigs for you.

Can you throw together a couple of images to a high standard within a short space of time? That’s an online side hustle that can prove to be very profitable. Are you great at creating snappy headlines or writing killer blog posts within minutes?

What about explainer videos: can you shoot/edit one in less than hour – a well-made one, that is? In short, the best online side hustles are those that can net you a reasonable sum of money in a short amount of time.

If you are stuck for ideas, maybe consider the following (online) roles:

  • Writing advertising copy for small companies and businesses who need it. Since people need copy that converts, this will always be in demand.
  • Social media management is great if you’re good at planning, strategizing and implementation. You may also have to engage with customers. You can do it for prolific bloggers, companies, start-ups…etc.
  • Creating simple websites can definitely be lucrative if you’re able for it and can do it in accordance with a customers’ needs.
  • Basic or advanced video & image editing work is always in demand. Creating/editing a video here and there can land you a few dollars in your account.

What about paid online surveys and other sources of side income?

Now I have to be blunt. The vast majority of these online side hustles are shit. The likes of Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, Paid Online Surveys and “micro tasks” (whatever…) pay an absolute pittance. You are better off investing time setting up a more specialized and in-demand side hustle and doing some basic marketing (go on Upwork, Fiverr etc.). It won’t bring you money straight away, but then again “get cash quick” will always remain a pipe dream.

Conclusion

With online side hustles, you become a mini-freelancer. You’re setting up a small side business and you need to let people know about it. You should also consider your network. If you’re on social media, ask around and say that you’re offering your skills in a certain area. You may be surprised by the response.

So are they worth it? Absolutely: if you play your cards right and know when and where to hustle.

Setting Up Your Mobile Office

A mobile office is probably one of the most essential tools for a digital nomad. You need to be able to whip out your laptop and work – from almost anywhere. Especially if you want to practice the art of efficiently working and traveling.

In most cases, this means getting a travel-friendly laptop. One that has enough processing power for you to complete tasks (especially if you work with videos and/or other graphics). It must also be light so that you’re not dragging a weight around – and must fit any bag you carry.

Of course, setting up a mobile office goes far beyond buying a laptop.

There are a couple of other tools that make the set up even easier.

The basics of a mobile office

Choose the right laptop

I’ve just said this, but I’ll repeat: the core of an efficient mobile office is a good laptop. You must able to (easily) carry it around. Make sure it fits snugly into your shoulder bag/backpack. Make sure the screen is big enough (some people can work with small screens, others go crazy).

antique typewriter 400x
Typewriters are cool and retro… but would you really want to lug one around?

With regards to size and compact portability, Dell and Acer have some pretty nice models. Acer’s TravelMate range, in particular, is designed exactly for what it says on the tin. Size-wise, Apple’s computers aren’t terrible either.

Have your own power supply

Ideally, wherever you work should have power outlets available. Having trekked through cafes in various European cities, I’m aware that this isn’t always possible. Especially on trains. If you’re working 10+ hours without an outlet, you need to have a backup supply handy. Plenty of power banks are available nowadays.

potatoes
Delicious and nutritious but not a great source of power. Seriously, invest in a power bank.
Note: Make sure you find a power bank that can charge laptops! There is a difference!

Bags!

I’m not very fancy when it comes to bags. My current office holder is a cheap Ikea design – yet its perfect thanks to the various compartments it has. A lot of bags these days have a special pocket specifically designed for laptops, so make use of it. In addition, make sure there are separate compartments for USB cables, plug adaptors, your phone, etc.

Plug Adaptors

For a mobile office, these couldn’t be more important. Even in Europe, there are differences between plugs depending on whether you’re in the UK or on the mainland. Tuck a few necessary plug adaptors into your bag and leave them there. It will seriously throw a spanner in your plans and leave you scrambling to go to the next electronics store if you forget.

Headphones

If you have regular meetings, you should really conduct them in a quiet space. It could be your bedroom or a bathroom… Noisy cafes aren’t advisable. That being said, headphones are still a plus. Not just in terms of having a meeting, either: you may simply want to drown out the surrounding noise and concentrate on your work!

Setting up a mobile office really is that simple… Although it can be as elaborate as you like. The main point is that you want to be able to whip it out and start working wherever you are.

Are Remote Work and Travel Really a Good Mix?

The year’s drawing to a close and this has been playing on my mind. Especially since I’ve done a lot of it this year. Remote work and travel seem to go hand in hand… but sometimes I just wonder how well these two things really mix.

I’ve worked from home (read: “remotely”) for a long time. I’ve also traveled and worked, sometimes simultaneously. This year, I’ve really been abusing those privileges. Planned and unplanned stints to Spain, the Black Forest, the windy city of Hamburg… And constantly going back and forth to Ireland (thanks, Ryanair, I guess…).

The true beauty? Only a fraction of those journeys involved actually using my vacation days.

Amidst this traveling though, I wondered…

With all the extra stress and planning involved, are travel and remote work really a good match?

Is it better to sit at home and focus? With only the occasional stint to the coffee shop? In some cases, I’d say yes (at least for me). Then again, it often depends…

Successful remote work and travel

The fact that digital nomads exist tells us that successful remote work and travel probably does happen. Of course, a lot of that is self-reporting, so it should be taken with a pinch of salt. A nomad’s lifestyle often involves hopping from city to city, country to country. Very frequently, too. But is this actually feasible for the majority of people? Or would most of us pass out from the stress?

I’ll be honest here. If anything, I’m more of a part-time digital nomad. I don’t think I’d enjoy the hustle, at least not long-term. When it comes to work, I’m very focused, very proactive and communicative with my team: but add the extra stress of constantly organizing flights and sorting out accommodation, I think I’d go spare.

That’s just me though. I guess I’m more of an opportunistic digital nomad rather than a “part time” one. I use my remote work privileges to travel when the mood strikes.

How to (effectively) travel and work remotely

Okay, so remote work and travel can be done by some people – especially those who thrive on constant activity. But if you’re a remote worker who still wants to at least occasionally travel, it’s good to keep a few things in mind.

  • When it comes to a job -any job- remember: it’s still a damn job! You cannot shirk responsibility because, oh no, you’re now on a plane and there’s no wifi.
  • If you are “working on the go”, prepare for it. This is easier for freelancers than full-time remote workers, of course. If you’re traveling that day, let your teammates/clients know you won’t be available at certain times. Don’t just randomly disappear in the middle of the day.
  • Be equipped! If you’re traveling on trains and buses, make sure you have enough battery power. And enough mobile data!
  • Be mindful of timezones and adjust your worktimes/arrangements accordingly.
  • As always, communicate if you have any problems and let people know.

A lot of this is just common sense. Which unfortunately isn’t all that common.

Remote Digital Marketing Jobs and How to Land Them

Remote digital marketing jobs are common, right?

You’d really think so. At the very least, online marketing positions give you the option to work remotely. It’s all about selling things online, after all. We’re not out there putting up billboards, handing out flyers on the street or any other such nonsense. Online marketing has become a highly technical job. Researching, strategizing, conceiving content, creating content, social media monitoring, building websites… It’s the perfect work from home job.

So naturally, you can imagine my massive disappointment when I found out just how scarce remote digital marketing jobs seem to be.

When I started looking for my next full-time remote gig, I was naïve and figured it was easy.

Boy, I was WRONG.

Instead, searching for a remote marketing meant trawling the usual channels (Indeed, LinkedIn, contacts etc.). I got interviews but when push came to shove, quite a few (read: far too many) expected me to up sticks and move to whatever backwater their office was located. And let me repeat: These were jobs that were 100% done online.

Look at any standard job ad in the realm of SEO, social media or paid advertising. There are some exciting roles out there. Until you read…

Benefits: A beautiful office located in the heart of Berlin. Free coffee, tea, soft drinks, fruit snacks, games…

“Games?”. I’m not six years old. And don’t get me started on those who describe their workplaces as a “fun” office. The reason I work is to get paid for my expertise, not spend my days at an adult day care center.

I also don’t care how “beautiful” your office is. My apartment is nicer. I can actually get work done without pointless distractions and petty office wars.

daenarys targaryan 400x
Pretty much sums up how I feel when someone has the gall to distract me from my work over something trivial.

Sure, plenty of the positions I applied for had a “work from home” option. Compared to my current job, that just didn’t cut it. It’s a big leap going from a mostly remote setup to suddenly sitting at the same desk nearly every day.

A MASSIVE leap.

One thing did give me hope, however. While many companies were still stuck in the 1980s in this regard, a significant portion of employers were very open to a remote setup (startups, more than anyone else).

So, while there aren’t many marketing jobs to be found via remote job boards – there are actually plenty of digital marketing positions you can do remotely. You just need to know how to land them.

Hence this post.

There’s an easier way to find remote digital marketing jobs

Don’t rule out remote-first jobs just because the competition is high. Chances are slim, but you never know. More importantly, remember: working in an office is the default. Most modern companies maintain outdated working methods because that’s what they know. Working remotely is slowly being accepted in many sectors. However, remote workers outside of the tech industry have organized “mobile” setups themselves… By asking for it.

You don’t even have to touch remote job boards (though I’d recommend you throw a few resumes that way, chances are slim but you never know!). The good news is that there are definitely more remote digital marketing jobs out there than are advertised. The first thing you’ve got to remember is that working in an office is the default. Employers expect it because that’s how its been since the Industrial Revolution (on a fun note, people have been working from home for about 1.4 million years).

So how do you get a remote role without using specialized job boards? Well, just ask.

Wait, really? It’s really that simple?

Yes. Your prospective employer may say no… But really, that’s the worst they can say. Asking for a remote work environment is no different to asking about other perks or a bigger salary. Additionally, remote digital marketing jobs are best found in startups rather than big companies. Though if some corporate giant wants you, don’t be afraid to ask.

Successfully securing a remote setup

First things first: know what you want. Know exactly what type of remote setup you’re looking for. Do you want to be entirely remote? Are you happy to travel to their office at least a few times a year? Or… Do you mind going in on a weekly basis, one or two days? Perhaps you simply prefer having the option to work from home.

As with any position, read what they say about the job. Apply for it, sell yourself. Maybe slightly emphasis your remote working skills… But don’t overdo it. In addition:

  • As with any other job, emphasize your skills and how they can be applied to the position. Your employer doesn’t care about your desire to work from home. They care only about how you can contribute to the company.
  • Do not mention remote working straight off the bat. Only talk about it after you’ve discussed the role, your experience and your skills.
  • When you do discuss a remote setup, ask about their “work environment”. If you’ve held a remote position before, don’t be afraid to say it. Explain that it’s the style you’re used to.
  • Should your employer seem open to the idea, proceed.

This advice goes not just for online marketing, but any position that can theoretically be done from home. The main takeaway here is that you have to ask for some things. Remote digital marketing jobs are more plentiful than you think. You just need to be tactful!